Finally after a bit of a hiatus we're restarting online tidal meetups in a couple of weeks, starting with Aravind talking about his Konnakol work. We'll try our discord for this, check info including the time in your local timezone here:
club.tidalcycles.org/t/tidal-c
Thanks and please share this thread to let people know this a/c is active!

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Tidal version 1.9.0 is on the way, with new stuff including a reworked scheduler based on the link protocol. This makes in-time collaboration with other link-enabled software (including other instances of tidal and the afore-mentioned vortex) as easy as plugging into the same network. Link is a open synchronisation protocol developed by Ableton but you don't need any of their software to use it!

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Back in Haskell land, with summer of code funding, Aravind Mohandas is exploring representing the ancient vocal patterns of Konnakol in Haskell, which is feeding into major new functionality in Tidal. Check out Aravind's blog here:
dev.to/aravindmohandas

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Time for a TidalCycles update thread!
Tidal now has official, actively developed ports in languages other than Haskell.
Check out strudel in Javascript:
github.com/tidalcycles/strudel
and vortex in Python:
github.com/tidalcycles/vortex/

I'm doing an invited talk at the psychology of programming annual workshop 6th Sept
ppig.org/workshops/2022-annual

Abstract:
*Live coding and the 'what-if' paradigm*
Live coding is an 'end-user programming' community of musicians and other performing artists, which has developed rather separately from the world of software engineering over the past 20 years. As a result, it has some peculiarities. In particular, improvisation is strongly promoted across the community, supported through technological developments such as pure functional reactive programming, in-code visualisation, and algorithmic approaches to pattern-making informed by heritage practices. Through this talk, I'll try to argue that this improvisatory approach offers a third paradigm in programming, combining the 'what' of declarative programming, and the 'how' of imperative programming, to offer an alternative: 'what if?' I'll try to sketch out the difference, why it's needed, and how we might support its development. In the end, the question is how such a formal, explicit approach to notation as computer programming can help us explore what we know, but can't explain.

post.lurk.org

A fediverse community for discussions around cultural freedom, experimental, new media art, net and computational culture, and things like that.

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