been looking at speech synthesis again and came across this which seems preeeeeeeeetty darn comprehensive: charlesames.net/sound/speech-s .

previously only futzed around with vowel formants in pure data and was looking into how to model consonants but it looks like there many more worms in the can i have opened 😩 😩 😩 (on a sidenote, do worms really come in cans and is the worm-in-can packaging method problematic?)

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@mrufrufin I guess you've seen pink trombone? imaginary.org/program/pink-tro
I got into speech synthesis during my doctoral studies, section 3.5 on 'vocable synthesis' might be interesting slab.org/writing/thesis.pdf

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@yaxu thx, i'll check your work out!

yep, familiar with pink trombone =P i've always found it kind of a risque sounding name...

@mrufrufin @yaxu I love stumbling on vocal synthesis resources. Looks like I've got some things to read up on, which I'm very excited about!

My Voc project is basically a port of pink trombone to C. Also, my first stab at literate programming (yikes!). I've been meaning to do a rewrite for years, but the tangled code still works just fine: pbat.ch/proj/voc

If you haven't seen/heard it already, Perry Cook's "Sheila" is quite fun, and his phd thesis is also a good resource on physical model vocal synthesis techniques cs.princeton.edu/~prc/SingingS

@paul @mrufrufin Ah ace! Have you thought about an open sound control interface for voc?

@yaxu @mrufrufin well, not exactly. I rarely use Voc as a standalone thing. It is included in my Soundpipe project as part of my music DSP ecosystem now, where it gets used together with other algorithms in my projects like Monolith and Sporth. If I were to do anything with OSC again, I'd probably put it there.

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