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In the book '1493' by Charles C. Mann it is argued that the 'little ice age', a period of exessively cold winters and summers during the 14th to 19th centuries which caused massive famines etc in the northern hemisphere, was partly of human origin. While it probably had multiple interacting causes, the extreme depopulation of the Americas, which came as a consequence of the Colombian Exchange and later colonization of the americas was apparently an accelerant. These events lead to a rewilding and reforestation which sequestered atmospheric carbon on such a scale that the co2 in the atmosphere sank. This created a global cooling, the reverse of global warming happening now.

Whatttt

@rra In a way that does not surprise me. There were quite some controlled fires and other ways of managing the land in place before 1492 in the Americas.
This episode of How to save a planet talks about a lot of complex matters, one of them ancient land management techniques..
gimletmedia.com/shows/howtosav

@wendy yeah, that is actuallually richly and nicely described in the book '1492' by the same author.

According to the wiki article on the little ice age the depopulation theory as a cause has two other mayor contributors before the columbian exchange: depopulation of Europe & Mid East because of the bubonic plage and the collapse of various civilizations after the mongol invasions.

One onders if massive reforestation and rewilding can help mitigate climate change. Seems like the only solid carbon capture technique there is.

@rra Aaah Charles C. Mann is the The Wizard and the Prophet author. Interesting.
1491 seems like a good porthole..
My current response :
-- If everyone would convert the thing they call a garden (millimeter grass, sparse controlled plant growth, artificially watered) into a "wild" biotope then..
-- etc etc

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