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When something goes wrong with software from some large corporation, users are likely to blame themselves and assume they have done something "wrong". When similar problems happen using small FLOSS projects, users are likely to curse the developers.

The success of commercial software has a lot to do with the power dynamics. The user has to conform to the conditions set by the all-powerful publisher. But with FLOSS things are more equal and assigning blame is messier.

I think this is one reason why the "enterprise" software world is shifting more and more towards FLOSS. IT managers don't feel like they have to conform to the whims of software companies and they feel empowered enough to say _no_.

@praxeology I think Walmart could save hundreds, if not thousands of dollars a year by figuring out how to deploy commerce services and email over Debian.

And if they're intrepid enough, could fix their own patches faster than Debian can.

@praxeology for me personally it's more like:

- problem with large corp. software: "what a trash fire, how many well paid people are working on this?!"

- problem with FLOSS: "aww look at this budding flower trying to grow. You'll get there buddy 🐣 🌼"

@praxeology I think some of this has to do with what people consider "normal". "Alternative" software somehow has to prove itself as being okay even if the "normal" software was a trashfire to begin with.

@be Yes indeed. I'd say "normal" is another word for "the dominant culture". And when a product development team in decides to push through some new design choices, the power users and subjugated developers might complain but in the end, almost everyone simply accepts it and changes their behavior accordingly.

@be Made a typo there...
"team in" should be followed by your favorite digital suburbia – Redmond, Cupertino, Mountain View

@praxeology As a general trend, I think volunteer developers care more about quality than people doing work because they are getting paid. So users get upset when "alternative" software doesn't meet *their* expectation of having every feature they want even if those features in the "normal" software are held together with toothpicks and bubblegum to meet some arbitrary deadline a manager declared and the tech debt will kill the software in 5-10 years.

@be @praxeology Looking at you, Perforce! And every software made by them that we use at my workplace!

@praxeology Unless you're my old High School teacher, in which case you would believe that computers and computer software don't have issues or glitches, and that whenever something goes wrong with the machine/program, it's do to user incompetence.

@praxeology you paid for that software so if you admit it's a dev fault, you admit you made a bad decision buying it and got "duped"

tech AMF capitalism 

@praxeology A someone who's been in and out of big tech for a few years, I'm curious how empowering your users to file bugs affects the power dynamic

my hypothesis is that people find it easier to blame big companies when they can make the companies listen to them (while it's much easier to feel like a small foss project will listen), and that the self-blame comes mostly from feeling helpless.

@praxeology i think this is also why a lot of people bitch about linux but are okay when windows has tons of issues

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