Time to learn about urban and suburban farming.

And also regular farming.

Who here is doing that work?

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@ajroach42

Seeds and their people podcast
True Love Seeds Farm
Philadelphia Orchard Project
Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission
Haley House
Permaculture Action Network
The book "The River Is In Us" by Elizabeth Hoover has really good detail on community based research to inform gardening practices, also has content on her blog

ehn.org/black-farming-food-sov

thesunmagazine.org/issues/523/

@grumpy
@tickfoot
@liaizon

@ajroach42

There are many urban farms popping up in Brooklyn under the agtech scene you can take that with a grain of salt

NYC Mayor-elect Adams is also trying to get NYCs first food policy transition implemented adamstransition2021.com/en-US/

@pixouls @ajroach42 @grumpy @tickfoot

I grew up on a permaculture commune, we grew most of our own food for the first half of my life. what sorta learning are you wanting to start with?

@liaizon @pixouls @grumpy @tickfoot I'm looking for a couple of different things.

1) books and zines that I can share

2) anecdotes on what worked and what didn't

3) tips on food producing techniques that can be practiced year round and in small or indoor spaces.

4) suggestions on where to start the journey.

@liaizon @pixouls @grumpy @tickfoot We have access to 6 acres of farm able land, plus space for lots of raised beds and gardens. We have a community that has lots of land, but little knowledge and fairly intense poverty based on a tourist economy.

When things go sideways, I want to make sure people don't starve, and help them cultivate the toolkit and mindset to sustain themselves.

@ajroach42 @liaizon@wake.st @pixouls @grumpy
I would direct your focus toward permaculture principles. Not only for the aspect of sustainable food production, but for resilient economies and communities. And then of course dive into growing. If you're super new to it, start with a cup of dirt and a seed and let the plants teach you. It's an art form and can't be obtained quickly. Anyone you can talk to locally that's familiar with your growing zone and desired practices would be very helpful as well.

@ajroach42 Regarding food producing techniques that can be practiced year round and in small or indoor spaces... sprouts. Seeds, soak in water (generally overnight), rinse daily or a couple times a day, within a week or so fresh greens. Mason jars and porous lids. Light neither required nor forbidden. All ages. Can be as low tech or high tech as you want. Rotate the jars so there's a rolling harvest of fresh greens every day all year for pennies a week.

:jrbd: 🥬

@ajroach42 I think most states have an agriculture extension service in partnership with USDA. I have never contacted them, but the USDA connection should be useful for things like which crops grow best in your area, which crops can only survive in greenhouses, and things like that.

I think the extension would work through one of your state-owned university campuses.

@ajroach42 I second @lnxw37a2's recommendation for contacting your county extension office, but be aware that (sample size 2 in 2 different states plus skim of online materials in at least 4 others) they tend to make assumptions that won't be accurate for your project. And, they may be behind the curve regarding plant & soil ecosystem concerns. If the extension office knows a crossover master naturalist/master gardener, that is who you want.

@ajroach42 If there are people in the community that you're working with who are interested and have time, you could fund sending them to the master naturalist &/or master gardener training. Then you'd have in-community becoming-experts with the contacts to get more help when needed. And, there is usually an annual volunteer hours requirement for MGs & MNs; you might be able to get your project registered & other MGs/MNs would show up to help.

@lnxw37a2

suggestions on where to start the journey.


Start now. Plant a seed.

Be aware that every crop has a (usually different) natural enemy which will try to get to the "fruit" before you do. Your job is to harvest after it's ripe but before anything else harvests it.

The climate and weather will also throw obstacles your direction. You can and will lose everything overnight and be forced to start over. Hundreds of times.

Soil isn't inert. It is a life form. Feed it and nurture it or nothing that grows in it will survive.

Good luck.

@pixouls @ajroach42 @grumpy @liaizon@wake.st

I'll add to this excellent list already started...
- The One-Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka
- The New Organic Grower by Elliot Coleman
- Teaming with Microbes by Jeff Lowenfels and Wayne Lewis
- Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer (for the deeper meaning/connection to food and nature)
- No-Till Growers Podcast
- discoverpermaculture.com (tons of excellent free resources)
- JADAM Organic (or any of Master Cho's original teachings)

@pixouls @ajroach42 @grumpy

- https://emergencemagazine.org/interview/reseeding-the-food-system/
- Finding the Mother Tree by Suzanne Simard
- gemini://gemini.sensorstation.co (we post quite a bit of our experiences here and try to share as much as possible.)

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