5/10 diversity

Because of the way it is structured, the strength and the main challenge of the fedi is how to foster and handle diversity.

People will join the fediverse for a variety of reasons and it is also not always an easy co-existance between different communities. There is no single organization that can dictate what is acceptable or not. This for example simultaneously creates a safe space for LGBTQI+ groups, but also for hategroups.

Moderation, how to do it properly, what are the tools that can help, where to draw the line, etc, is constantly debated and is an ongoing issue, but at least it is discussed and experimented with publicly through the fedi but also inside the communities developing the software.

This diversity is also expressed at the level of software. The fediverse is made up of different software projects such as Mastodon, Pleroma, Pixelfed or Peertube. There are also different apps you can use to connect to these servers, and they will all have different approaches and features, from micro-blogging to video streaming.

Here again, the question of cultural diversity is rightfully including and challenging the technical diversity needed and enabled by such an ambitious project.

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6/10 Field of art and culture production

What we think is important specifically for the field of art and culture production is that such a setup allows us to build independent digital infrastructures by and for cultural producers. But also infrastructure that do not stand by themselves but can work together.

The relationship between tech and the field of art and culture production has always been extremely ambivalent. At best cultural practices have been empowered by new computer technologies so as to explore and push the boundaries of net/software/media art discourses and aesthetics, while enabling tactical media and culture jamming strategies for those with a political agenda.

At worst though, art and culture production is completely instrumentalised by the tech industry who are essentially using the field's cultural capital and practitioners' precarity to introduce new products and services (NFTs, anyone?). In the case of social media, it turned the field into yet another source of disposable content that can be used to moneytize users eyeballs and mouse clicks.

At the same time we depend on such infrastructures to meet our peers, share and discuss work, create archives, find opportunities and share dank memes. This puts us in a difficult position.

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post.lurk.org

Welcome to post.lurk.org, an instance for discussions around cultural freedom, experimental, new media art, net and computational culture, and things like that.