is that of the user the best paradigm to understand online activity at large?

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what other paradigms of online activity are there? do human agents behave more as admins or moderators than users?

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to be clear: the admin is technically another type of user, but you get what i mean

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wikipedia: "Users of computer systems and software products generally lack the technical expertise required to fully understand how they work."

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Let's put it like this, using a thought experiment. The offline world suddenly disappears: no cities, no buildings, no bodies, no objects. Human agents are only able to interact through and within current digital interfaces. How human activity would differ? How our understanding of current online activities would differ?

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is world-building, understood as building a durable interface with the totality of the real, still possible online?

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again, following Arendt, one could say that a website is a work/object, while a platform is a machine

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While acting for her means breaking the "fateful automation of sheer happening". Sounds familiar?

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Reminded now that in his reflections on the "automatic society" Stiegler describes a shift from the everyday life to the administered life. Might be the 'Vita Administrativa' (both administering and being administering) the crucial sphere of activity missing in Arendt's model of human practical capacities?

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if I were to point out a fundamental paradigm shift of user behavior in terms of interaction with an interface, due to the advent of the corporate web, I'd say that the user was reconfigured as a scroller, and therefore as passive consumer because the interaction is purely mechanical and only accidentally performed manually.

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the paradox seems to be that web 2.0 which was supposed to bring MORE interactivity, eventually reduced it

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ok, I put some of these notes quickly together on the blog. Main idea: proletarisation of user interaction. Comments welcome! networkcultures.org/entrepreca

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@entreprecariat How would you relate clicking and scrolling? Eventually, clicking has also often been portrayed as a “poor” gesture of interaction.

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@jine do you have any reference about clicking being considered "poor"? I would see it like this: there is click, scroll and infinite scroll. It is true that scroll is more efficient and less consuming than clicking, but it's always aligned with the user's intention. Click is an action, an expression of will, so to speak, while scroll in an infinite scroll setting can become just automatic behavior.

@entreprecariat Thanks for the answer! In the book “Interface Culture” Steven Johnson mentions at one point (Chapter 4) thinkers who argue that clicking on links is missing something (but as part of a general culturally pessimistic view).
I read it in more detail somewhere, as a continuation of an argument of the German philosopher Hans Blumenberg, who wrote something about electricity and pushing buttons, but unfortunately I can’t find it right now.

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